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The Resource Cancer wars : how politics shapes what we know and don't know about cancer, Robert N. Proctor

Cancer wars : how politics shapes what we know and don't know about cancer, Robert N. Proctor

Label
Cancer wars : how politics shapes what we know and don't know about cancer
Title
Cancer wars
Title remainder
how politics shapes what we know and don't know about cancer
Statement of responsibility
Robert N. Proctor
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Cancer Wars explains why we still don't have straight answers to questions such as these: Why do rates from some cancers appear to have risen and others fallen? What are the relative risks of polluted water, radon in homes, and the natural toxins in peanut butter? Is it dangerous to use a cellular phone or to live near high-voltage wires? Are there "thresholds" of exposure to radiation or chemical toxins? If cigarettes cause up to 30 percent of all cancer, why has so little been done to discourage their production? And why does the National Cancer Institute spend only 3 percent of its budget on antitobacco efforts? After an overview of the history of attempts to understand cancer, the book introduces two of the foremost twentieth-century advocates of the environmental view of cancer: the little-known Wilhelm Hueper and his famous disciple, Rachel Carson. Proctor then moves to the 1970s, when claims that a large percentage of cancers could be caused by exposure to industrial pollutants gained currency, and then to the backlash during the Reagan era, when environmental and occupational health factors were downplayed. Proctor discusses the lobbying efforts of industrial research bodies and trade associations representing tobacco, asbestos, meat, coffee, and other special interest groups. He considers the debate over Bruce Ames's argument that "natural carcinogens" in foods pose a far greater threat than industrial pollutants or pesticides, and chronicles the political history of dose-response curves: Can a single molecule of a carcinogen cause cancer? A fascinating chapter on the history of radiation and cancer draws on censored information about uranium-mine concentration camps in Czechoslovakia. The author also discusses genetic factors and differential susceptibility to cancer. Finally, Proctor suggests how we might actually win the war on cancer
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
616.99/4
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
RC276
LC item number
.P76 1995
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
NLM call number
  • 1996 D-371
  • QZ 201
NLM item number
P964c 1995
Label
Cancer wars : how politics shapes what we know and don't know about cancer, Robert N. Proctor
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 328-340) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction: What do we know? -- A disease of civilization? -- The environmentalist thesis -- The percentages game -- The Reagan effect -- Doubt is our product -- Natural carcinogens and the myth of toxic hazards -- The political morphology of dose-response curves -- Nuclear nemesis -- Radon's deadly daughters -- Genetic hopes. Conclusion: How can we win the war?
Control code
31291134
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
viii, 356 pages
Isbn
9780465027569
Lccn
94038792
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)31291134
Label
Cancer wars : how politics shapes what we know and don't know about cancer, Robert N. Proctor
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 328-340) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction: What do we know? -- A disease of civilization? -- The environmentalist thesis -- The percentages game -- The Reagan effect -- Doubt is our product -- Natural carcinogens and the myth of toxic hazards -- The political morphology of dose-response curves -- Nuclear nemesis -- Radon's deadly daughters -- Genetic hopes. Conclusion: How can we win the war?
Control code
31291134
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
viii, 356 pages
Isbn
9780465027569
Lccn
94038792
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)31291134

Library Locations

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      250 W Preston St, Mount Pleasant, MI, 48859, US
      43.589263 -84.774313

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